Posts Tagged ‘Canton OH’

2012 Lincoln Highway conference in Canton

October 11, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
The Ohio chapters of the national Lincoln Highway Association, along with the official Ohio Lincoln Highway Historic Byway, are planning to bring over 200 visitors to the McKinley Grand Hotel in June 2012 for a week of lectures, seminars, day-long road trips, and banquets all with the theme of “Pathways & Presidents” and celebrating the Lincoln Highway.

The 2012 Lincoln Highway Association conference begins Monday, June 18, with a welcome reception open to anyone wishing to have answers about the historic road. Later in the week will be a special Marmon automobile exhibit.

In addition to official East and West tours, organizer Jim Cassler says there will be additional trips focusing on Ohio’s Amish Country, a train ride on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railway, and a trip to the Packard Museum in Warren honoring Lincoln Highway co-founder Henry Joy, then President of Packard Motors. Presidential activities will include Canton’s McKinley and the First Ladies Museum, while a trip to Marion will highlight Warren Harding’s involvement in the early highway.

Visit www.lincolnhighwayassoc.org or www.historicbyway.com for general history of the highway. Registration information will be available there at a later date.

Next gen gets Lincoln Highway bricks to archway

January 5, 2010

An Eagle Scout project for Brian Cassler will be a gift for Lincoln Highway fans forever. The Kearney Hub reports that Cassler’s efforts will result in a recreated stretch of the transcontinental road at the Great Platte River Road Archway that spans I-80 in central Nebraska. The Kearney paper has 25 photos online, as seen in the screen capture below.

“The original paving bricks are getting pretty rare,” said Ronnie O’Brien, director of education/operations at the archway. “We were going to contract with a brick company to recreate a piece of the Lincoln Highway.” Instead, workers in Canton, Ohio, a city of 78,000, found original bricks in 2008 while reconstructing city streets. Brian Cassler of Canton took on a project of cleaning, organizing and palletizing the [2,200] bricks from the famous highway.

Cassler, along with trucker Tim Wunsch of Fort Morgan, Colo., delivered the load of pavers to the archway Sunday. “The city of Canton donated the bricks to the archway to be used in the display,” O’Brien said. “The bricks had been under other construction, and they were dirty and in a huge pile. They needed to be cleaned up and scraped before they could be hauled here.” Cassler, who took on the project as part of his Eagle Scout requirements, spent several months preparing the bricks. Cassler’s father runs the Lincoln Highway Trading Post in Canton.

Check out highway merchandise at the Lincoln Highway Trading Post online store.

The Omaha World-Herald also ran a feature story about the project.

Palmantier's Motel (near Baywood bricks) for sale

June 11, 2009

The Canton Repository reports that a classic 9-unit motel along the Lincoln Highway in eastern Ohio is for sale. Fans will recognize it as being at the eastern end of the famous brick stretch of Baywood Street.

Palmantier’s Motel, opened 1947, was purchased four years ago by Scott Segeti, “lured to these parts by the beauty of nearby farm fields, grazing cattle, grassy meadows, chirping birds, fresh air and an opportunity to be his own boss.” Now Segeti is trying to sell the motel, swimming pool, two houses, and 3.25 acres for $425,000.

OH_Palmantier'sMotelPC

“I thought it was a gift from God,” he said.

He bought it on land contract from longtime owner Carolyn Koontz in 2005. He immediately digitized the motel’s old phone system. He hard-wired room fire alarms. He touched up units here and there. He moved into one four-bedroom house on the land and rented out the other.

Four years later, Segeti isn’t sure he can make it work.

The bad economy has squeezed the motel. Even for $50 a night, sometimes not a single room is rented. Its airy one- and two-bed country decor units remain empty. Most guests these days are building contractors who follow jobs into the area, stay for a few weeks and move on….

“It would be the ideal business for a retired couple,” Segeti said. “This place still has the ambiance of the 1950s. From a time when the whole world moved at a much slower pace.”