Posts Tagged ‘WY’

Fort Bridger's Lincoln Highway bridge doomed

April 30, 2010

The Bridger Valley Pioneer reported today on a public WYDOT meeting held April 27 at the Fort Bridger State Museum regarding an 80-year-old Lincoln Highway bridge that is becoming a danger.

The Blacks Fork Bridge on County Road 221, north of Fort Bridger, or the Lincoln Highway Bridge, is structurally unsound and can’t be brought up to safety standards without being removed and replaced….

Julie Francis, WYDOT archeologist, said the bridge was a concrete T-girder bridge built in 1921 under Federal Aid Project 17. The bridge was typical of bridges built at that period. The bridge included two spans so it was 160 feet long and 18.4 feet wide. She said there were also 3.5 miles of Lincoln Highway roadwork completed as part of the same project. She said the construction of the present bridge replaced a timber trestle bridge.

Wyo Lincoln Highway concrete bridge threatened

March 2, 2010

Wyoming’s Uinta County Herald reports that a Lincoln Highway-era bridge is being examined for possible replacement. The concrete span on County Road 221 north of Fort Bridger was built in 1921 on the Lincoln Highway. According to Laura Nowlin, historic preservation specialist at the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office, it is one of the oldest bridges on the Wyoming stretch of the famed coast-to-coast highway. However, Julie Francis, Wyoming DOT archeologist, said the bridge is in “extremely poor condition” and a proposal for replacing it has been prepared.

Vintage Roadside hits the Lincoln Highway

October 7, 2009

Looks like it might be another tough week to keep up with blogging — kids have the flu and I get more symptoms every hour. But here’s some cheery news (and a photo) from Jeff at Vintage Roadside.

WY_VintageR_BlackOrangeCabins

Kelly & I are on a road trip from Portland, OR to Nashville, TN for the National Trust annual conference and we’re driving the Lincoln Highway across Wyoming & Nebraska. We’re writing our blog and visited the Black & Orange cabins today in Fort Bridger, Wyoming. We linked to your post about the cabins to give people more history about them.

Read their adventures at vintageroadtrip.blogspot.com/.

Fort Steele building to be interpretive center

March 23, 2009

The Rawlins Daily Times reports (via The Seattle Times) that the post trader’s house at Fort Fred Steele Historic Site has been saved from its crumbling state and rehabbed. The fort, along the Lincoln Highway and I-80 about 12 miles east of Rawlins, Wyoming, was built in 1868 to guard against Indian attacks and used through 1886. A Salt Lake City firm stabilized the crumbling concrete of the house with a glasslike liquid that is absorbed and prevents concrete from crumbling. The strengthened walls are joined by a new roof, walls, hardwood floor, windows, and heat. Also known as the Chatterton House, the post trader’s house is being readied as an interpretive center. Fort Steele reopens for the summer May 1. Here are a couple videos about the site, one short but pretty, the other with some locals interviewed.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

In 1892, the graves of the soldiers and their dependents at Fort Steele were moved to Fort McPherson National Cemetery — along the Gothenburg Stairstep portion of the Lincoln Highway near Maxwell, Nebraska.