Posts Tagged ‘California’

Lincoln/US 50 closing for repair at Echo Summit

May 12, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
Starting May 11, Caltrans will close U.S. 50/Lincoln Highway at Echo Summit for approximately two weeks to replace a rock wall with a barrier that meets current safety standards while preserving the natural beauty. According to Way2Tahoe.com, traffic will be one-way on May 9–10 in preparation for the closure, and for approximately six weeks Monday through noon on Fridays following the full closure. (The highway will be open Memorial Day Weekend.) Highway 50 remains open to Placerville visitors and all other locations as far east as Sierra at Tahoe Resort. Click on the map to see it larger.

LHA conference committee meets at Lake Tahoe

April 20, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
The 19th annual Lincoln Highway Association conference will take place June 20–24 at Stateline, Nevada, on the south shore of Lake Tahoe. The host hotel is Harrah’s Lake Tahoe (along with with Harvey’s), where you will register for the conference, browse the book room, enjoy the Opening Night Banquet, attend the Thursday program lectures, and celebrate the end of a great conference with Friday’s Continental Breakfast Buffet.

Paul Gilger, conference committee co-chair, sent a report from a planning meeting held Saturday at Harrah’s. Among the 20 committee members attending from Nevada and California were Jim and Lani Bonar at head of table, Bob Dieterich to Lani’s left, Geno Oliver 3rd from right, Bob Chase front left, with Paul taking the photo.

The group took a tram up Heavenly Mountain to visit Lakeview Lodge, site of the awards banquet.

Paul took a telephoto shot of the conference hotels: Harveys at left, Harrah’s behind tree at right, and the Lincoln Highway between them.

And then a shot of the Rainbow Bridge at Donner Pass.

Offbeat 1917 LH brochure touts water fountain

January 27, 2011

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
A brochure scanned and online for free download touts a Lincoln Highway water fountain design that was to be placed from coast to coast. Also proposed were cement tourist cabins to be built resembling Abraham Lincoln’s log cabin. Both ideas intended to honor the slain President. A map shows the “Reno Branch” of the LH from Reno, Nevada to … Los Angeles!

http://openlibrary.org/books/OL24589131M/Lincoln_Highway_Fountain_Society

CA Lincoln Highway Assoc to tour Central Valley

October 18, 2010

LINCOLN HIGHWAY NEWS IS A BLOG BY BRIAN BUTKO
The California Lincoln Highway Association will tour the Central Valley Route from Sacramento to San Francisco, via Sacramento Valley and across the Carquinez Strait on Saturday, October 30. Tour departs and ends at the Holiday Inn Sacramento I-80 at 9 am. Cost $25 or $40 with a guide. Each year, the California Chapter of the LHA hosts four self-guided cruises and guided tours. Cruise along in your own car, or ride along as a passenger in one of our guide cars! The cruise is open to passenger cars, trucks, SUVs, motorcycles, classic cars, and antique cars capable of freeway speeds.

One-day excursion begins and ends in Sacramento. Highlights include: Old Sacramento, Tower Bridge, Yolo Causeway, Davis, Dixon, historic downtown Vacaville, the Solano County Courthouse, entrance into Napa Valley on Jameson Canyon Road, historic Vallejo, Carquinez Strait, Rodeo, Pinole, Berkeley Pier, Bay Bridge, Lincoln Highway markers in San Francisco. Return trip to Sacramento on I-80.

Advance registration required. Lunch not included but will include a stop for lunch, or tour participants may also bring their own food and snacks. For more details visit http://www.lincolnhighwayassoc.org/ca/tours/

Lincoln Highwayman — the film

August 19, 2010

In  discussing this summer’s journeys of James Devitt Jr., aka the Lincoln Highwayman, I mentioned a film The Lincoln Hiighwayman, based on a 1917 one-act play written by Paul Dickey. He also wrote the screenplay for the 1919 movie released by William Fox Film Corp. It featured William Russell (b. 1886), wh0 Fandango describes: “Although largely forgotten today, virile-looking, six-foot, two-inch William Russell was one of the most popular stars of early American films…. succumbing to pneumonia at the young age of 42.” Other credits to the film can be found at IMDB. A brief review of the play can be found in this April 1917 clipping from The New York Times.

You can purchase the movie still shown below from http://www.webstore.com

Fandango reprints a synopsis by Janiss Garza in All Movie Guide. Being on “a coastal highway” makes it sound likes it’s not the Lincoln Highway:

The Lincoln highwayman is terrorizing motorists on a coastal highway and the latest victims are a San Francisco banker and his family on their way to a party. While the masked highwayman holds them up at gun point and steals the women’s jewels, the banker’s daughter Marian (Lois Lee) finds herself strangely attracted to him. When the family finally arrives at the party, they tell the guests their tale. Steele, a secret service man (Edward Piel), takes an interest in their encounter and starts working on the case. Jimmy Clunder (William Russell), who arrives late is talking to Marian when a locket falls out of his pocket. Marian recognizes it, and Clunder claims that he found it on the road. She begins to suspect that he is the highwayman, as does Steele, Clunder’s rival for Marian’s love.

Late snow at Big Bend, California … well, in May

August 5, 2010

I get lots of emails and some slip by for months. Here’s an interesting one from May from Rick Etchells of Richmond, Texas:

My Friend Ken Rozek and I recently took a trip to follow the Lincoln Highway from San Francisco to Laramie, Wyoming. This was our third trip following the Lincoln Highway and we have now completed it all except for New Jersey and New York.

On all of these trips we used your great book Greetings From the Lincoln Highway and on this trip we also used your latest book The Lincoln Highway Companion. These made it much easier to find Lincoln Highway locations. We were able to duplicate the main photo that you have on the covers of both books.

A highlight of our trip in California was all of the snow we encountered at Big Bend Visitor Center in the Sierras. The section of Asphalt that you say is there was completely covered in snow. We had to walk over about 3 feet of snow just to get to the Lincoln Highway cement post!

Attached are a few photos of our visit at the Big Bend Visitor Center. Thanks so much for your very interesting blog and books about the Lincoln Highway.

More Lincoln Highway signs for California route

July 30, 2010

The Tracy Press reports that more reproduction LHA “Control Station” signs are being posted along the original Lincoln Highway route in western California: “A sign tacked on the front of the Tracy Inn provides another identification of 11th Street as a route of the historic Lincoln Highway, the first highway network to span the nation in 1915. The new sign identifies the Inn as a ‘Control Station,’ where motorists using mileage listed on the Lincoln Highway map can exactly gauge their location. Similar signs are being posted in Stockton, French Camp, and Livermore.”

This updates a story posted here last year about the signing the route here. Great work by Mike Kaelin and the California LH supporters!

Lincoln Highway trip done, Route 66 return

July 26, 2010

Don’t forget to follow along as John and Joyce Jackson of Delaware, Ohio, follow the Lincoln Highway westward. Actually, they’ve already reached the Pacific and are taking Route 66 back eastward but their adventures are preserved online. Follow along at blog.jacksonlhtour.com/.

Reporters follow Lincoln Highway eastward

September 2, 2009

From Oh My News comes a series of reports by David McLane documenting life in small towns along four major highways in the US. First was US 95 from Mexico to Canada, then south on US 395 from Canada near Laurier, Washington, then merging with I-15 near Hesperia, California (at one time it went all the way to Mexican border near San Diego and was called the “Three Flags Highway”). The third section of the journey is the Lincoln Highway, then wrapping up with US 60 starting at Virginia Beach.

CA_OhMyNews_Palace

To get to San Francisco, they went north through the central valley of California and Weedpatch, made famous by John Steinbeck’s “Grapes of Wrath.” This report ends when they reach “the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park, the west end of the Lincoln Highway”:
english.ohmynews.com/.

Now they’re on their way driving eastward: english.ohmynews.com/. Click at the end of each article to see the two reports since this one. You’ll find some interesting observations about life along the road, and some cool photos too.

New SF travel column boosts Lincoln Highway

September 1, 2009

A new travel column at San Fransico’s examiner.com features the Lincoln Highway‘s Western Terminus marker and maps out a trip across California and Nevada.

CA_SF_Examiner travel